Thursday, November 27, 2014

Black Friday Deals

Folks, Black Friday is practically here and there are some great offers. Here are some deals I saw being mentioned in various preparedness and EDC forums.
$20-$10 Range
Leatherman Wingman Multi Tool $19.96


Kershaw Lifter $9.99

18 bucks was already a great price, 9.99 is a steal.
SABRE Pepper Spray - Advanced 3-In-1 Police Strength $14.55
SABRE Pepper Spray - Advanced 3-In-1 Police Strength - Large Magnum Tactical Spray
$50-$30 Range
SOG Specialty Knives & Tools S66N-CP PowerAssist Multi-Tool $50.48

Schrade SCHF9 Extreme Survival $33.32

Beast 1095 steel survival knife, comes with a great sheath too.
+$100
Casio Rangeman "Master of G" $208.50

This one is on my personal wish list. I like the name, I like the looks, I like that its pretty much an upgraded solar Protrek which I’m very fond of, but with the added benefit of being G-Shock ruggerized.

Samsung S5 Active $634.99

 Do yourself a favor and go Android. The S5 is the rugged version of Samsung's flagship model. Dust proof and water resistant, intended for outdoors use.

Aimpoint PRO Patrol Rifle Optic $396.00
Aimpoint PRO Patrol Rifle Optic
Red dot that is always on for 3 years.
FerFAL

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

My take on the Shooting of Michael Brown


Monday, November 24, 2014

Self-defense in a “flash mob”‏ / Riot?


Ferfal,
Do you have any thoughts about how a CPL/CCW/CHL holder should react in a flash mob situation that turns potentially violent? I know that the best scenario would be to leave when the mob begins, but say you’re trapped in a store when they start trashing the place, and they see you and decide you’re to blame for their economic troubles and start to come at you. In such a situation, your life is in definite danger, but you can’t just start shooting indiscriminately. Any advice? With the Ferguson ruling expected any day now, things might get interesting in a hurry.
Dan



Hi Dan,
Its an interesting topic. Right now we’re waiting to see what happens in Ferguson but this can truly happen anywhere. Between riots, looting and flash mobs, its important to know how to react, what to do and what NOT to do.

First, get proper training. Even before buying a gun, learn how to use it properly. Shooting cans with your cousin or uncle does not constitute professional defensive shooting training. If you haven’t been properly trained, no matter how well you think you shoot you still haven’t don’t know how to FIGHT with the gun, and that’s very different from target practice and hunting.
Second, its important to actually carry your weapon at all times whenever possible. I have said so many times but its worth repeating. The gun left in the safe will do you no good, it’s the one on your hip that matters when the chips are down.
When it comes to dealing with a mob, the first thing to keep in mind is that drawing a gun is the last thing you want to do. Stay calm, its probably not about you and if its not about you don’t change that by bringing your gun to the equation. Leave it in your holster for now. Whenever possible, leaving, even running is better than shooting someone. I’ve been caught in a number of protests, roadblocks and lootings. In most cases you are better served by remaining calm and moving away from the group. That alone works beautifully well. When it comes to getting trapped, try to avoid that as much as possible. Whenever walking into any room, always identify at least two exit points. The one you just walked through would be one, but find another one. Fire or riot, you still need to know how to escape.

If the violence is directed against you and you can’t escape, we’re talking about a pretty bad series of events where many mistakes were already made. In this case, with your safety at risk and a reasonable fear for your life, you can bring out your gun. This doesn’t mean you start shooting, but it may still help, as guns often do. No one wants to get shot, and with your gun drawn you may have bought a few seconds given the surprise/fear factor guns usually have. Make the most of those seconds, move away fast. If you wait too long those nearby may lose that fear, become more bold and try grabbing you forcing you to escalate. Of course you want to avoid this as much as possible. If that’s the only option left and its either shoot or get killed, shoot the closest, most violent attacker first, quickly move to the second one and assess the situation before engaging again. One guy dropping after getting shot usually causes those around him to reconsider their actions. How cool and in control you remain will decide if they rush you or not, so you better know what you are doing and do your best to stay in control.

Maybe the most important thing to keep in mind regarding such a delicate situation is training. Proper training will be crucial so as to control the situation, have enough confidence, project that confidence towards the mob, and ultimately have self-control so as to know when to shoot and when not to. Untrained, nervous people are far more likely to mess up, maybe even accidentally shoot, effectively escalating the situation.
Get training, carry your weapon and stay calm!
FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Winter is Coming… at least 10 dead already


Folks, be careful out there.




I hope you have all followed the advice mentioned here before several times. Stock up on basic supplies such as ready to eat food, water, medical supplies, radio, flashlights and batteries. Have alternative means of heating, enough fuel and backup for those. Have a generator, but don’t forget a kerosene heater or a Mr. Heater as your backup’s backup.
Keep in mind the main causes of death that repeat themselves each winter:

*Heart attacks while shoveling snow: Take it VERY easy and take breaks often.

*Exposure: Either because of a mental illness, underestimating the weather conditions or simply ending up trapped in your vehicle in the middle of the storm.

*Car accidents: Avoid going out if possible, get your tire chains and be very careful of black ice.

*Slipping on ice when walking: Lots of injuries and broken hips because of this.

Take care people!

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Thrunite T10T Titanium: Functional, Elegant & Affordable


How useful are flashlights? Let me put it this way: While installing the included clip I dropped one of the small hex screws and had to use the same flashlight I was attempting to install it on to find said screw under the table. I just don’t understand anymore how anyone can function without a flashlight in their pocket.

As it happens with most everyday carry items, flashlights eventually become more than just a tool and it becomes a personal totem, a lucky charm of sorts. We want out gear and tools to work and work well. Be rugged and durable. But if they can look good while doing so that’s even better. In the world of EDC, aluminum is cheap, stainless is tough and classy (though heavy) and titanium means premium, combining both durability and light weight. The Leatherman Charge is a perfect example. Its durable, practical, yet no matter how much you use it, it still holds on and still looks good, providing a small bonus pleasure whenever you clip it to your pocket. EDC items must be functional above all things, but if they also look good and you enjoy having them around then that’s even better.


 
Thrunite T10T
Thanks to its slick looks and titanium construction, the Thrunite T10T does just that, and it does it at a very affordable price. The T10T is a good looking yet tough flashlight, drop tested to 1.5m and water resistant to IPX-8 (2 meters). Dropping it a few times from a height of 5 feet on a wooden floor the flashlight showed no signs of damage, neither did spending half an hour in a muddy puddle. These aren’t extreme tests but the kind of thing that may happen during normal use when accidentally dropped either indoors or out in the field.

The Thrunite T10T reflects that simplicity and elegance both on its exterior design and its user interface. It uses a single AA battery, commonly available. It has a reverse clicky interface, although it can also be used as a twisty when left ON. Clicking on the tail switch turns the flashlight on and clicking again or tapping on the switch cycles through three different modes, low (0.2 lumens/147 hours), medium (20 lumens/39 hours) and high (169 lumens/ 1.5 hours). The memory function remembers the last mode used. You can choose between cool white or neutral white XP-G2 LED.
ThruNite T10T CW 169 Lumen Single Cree Xp-G2 LED Edc Flashlight
The T10T comes in a nice presentation metal box. I generally don’t care about packaging, but it does make for a better presentation when giving it as a gift. The light comes with a clip that is easily installed. This is recommended because it makes the light easier to hold on to, you can clip it to your pocket and it stops the light from rolling around on flat surfaces. Thrunite website shows a two year warranty for any manufacturers related problems and service after that with the client paying for the materials needed for any repairs. Included in the box along with the light is a plastic diffuser wand. This works pretty well and given that the light can stand on its tale it turns the EDC light into a lantern. Given the long runtime and the affordable batteries it uses this makes the T10T a very viable option for power outages and emergency lighting.
The Thrunite T10T is available in Amazon or through Thrunite’s website.

FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.